A Photo an Hour (Epic Fail)

I always like these posts when people, like Bev at Confuzzledom, do them; they give a glimpse into other people’s lives. I’m very nosy, and enjoy these pockets of every day lives, lived in other parts of the world. I guess it’s the same reason that I love those lit-up seconds peering into windows as ytou go past on the train or bus.

There’s usually an official day to do “A Photo An Hour” but I always miss it. So on Saturday I thought I would do my own.

I woke up quite late – Mr FD had got up earlyish to go for a ride. The Club were leaving at 8.30, but he decided not to go. He woke me up to tell me that he wasn’t going… Thanks, love.

So I didn’t take a photo immediately on getting up. I had my bottom half shower/top half sponge wash – it’s not been quite as bad as I expected, not properly showering, or using deodorant, but I guess that’s because I’ve not really exerted myself very much! Then I had my breakfast and browsed FB. Here is my breakfast tray (finished)

9.30

I had half juice/half water, coffee, a slice of buttered toast and an apple. The little dish is for all my tablets – glucosamine, plant sterols, Omega-3 oil, plus three “medical” tablets for various ailments. I set the alarm on my phone for 1 hour hence, and read my book.

10.30

At 10.30 I had gone out to buy some yoghurt in the Bio Shop. They only had vanilla-with-chocolate-bits-in so I didn’t buy any. It is deliciously creamy yoghurt, so I can’t imagine it’s that good for you, but I don’t want chocolate adding more not-good-for-you-ness! I want the mango yoghurt back please!

There’s a queue at the boulangerie, which is decked out in French flags – I’m not sure if it’s for Bastille Day (which is today, Saturday- or at least “today” the day I’m writing about.) or for the World Cup final tomorrow (which is today, the day I’m writing this!)  in which France is playing Croatia. I join the queue to buy our usual Petrisane Graine – a softer baguette, made with seeds. I was tempted by the cakes, but didn’t succumb. (I’m writing this on Sunday, as a scheduled post for Wednesday. I did succumb today – a strawberry tartlet to share between the two of us!)

Unfortunately I forgot to set my alarm for the next hour – so it wasn’t until 4.00 in the afternoon, when I next looked at my phone that I realised I hadn’t taken any photos in the intervening five-and-a-half hours! Mind you, it wouldn’t have been very interesting:

11.30 Sat at the computer

12.30 Eating lunch (sausage sandwich)

13.30 Zentangling

14.30 Zentangling

15.30 Having a lie down.

16.30 Still having a lie down

17.30 Chopping up green peppers for a beef stroganoff

18.30 Stirring the beef stroganoff.

19.30 Watching TV – an interesting programme from the author of H is for Hawk, about training a goshawk. (Having eaten the beef stroganoff in the intervening hour)

20.30 Watching TV – Doctor Who on i-player

21.30 Watching TV – an epiosode of “Picnic at Hanging Rock” that had been recorded.

22.30 Going to bed…reading, then lying awake until about midnight worrying about how we’d get out of the house in the case of a fire. This is because the smoke alarm had gone off for no apparent reason earlier in the evening, so I was worried about an undetected fire smouldering somewhere. How would we get out of our third floor bedroom window? Could we carry a cat in a bag (Bib was on the bed)? Would the other cats survive? Could we get onto the roof? Was the ladder in the study, under the eaves? What’s the number for the Pompiers? Would a rope made of torn up duvet cover hold our weight? How quickly would our old, wood filled house burn? Actually, it is a valid worry, and something we have thought about, but not in great detail. Perhaps we should…

Anyway – a photo an hour? Hmm. So much for that idea!

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The Tour* comes to Town

* but no, not THAT Tour

I may have mentioned (once or twice!) that Mr FD rides a bike with the St Just cycle club

Let’s be honest, quite a lot of our social life and many of our holidays involve the Cycle Club in some form!

Mr FD in action, somewhere outside Frejus.

Les Cyclos de St Just

Anyway, on Saturday, a big cycle race came to town – not as big as the Tour de France, but a professional race nonetheless – Le Tour du Pays Roannais –

and Les Cyclos had responsibility for providing lunch for the organisers, and also running the Buvette – the drinks stall. They were also selling sausage & chips to the general public. I couldn’t help, being still very fatigued (and being en route back from Clermont on Saturday morning) but everyone pitched in, including Friend Cathy.

Obviously, before the big day, Mr FD (as part of the Cycle Club committee) was very busy, organising things, borrowing, buying, sorting out stuff, sourcing barbecues and fridges. Then from 7.00 am on the day he, and many others, were erecting the pergolas, setting up the barbecue, and chip fryers, cooling beers and wine and soft drinks ready for service. When I arrived it was all in full swing, very well-organised and running smoothly.

The start line was right outside our house. And I mean “right outside”

From the dining room window!

A rather blurry photo, showing our house, with the “stage” just in front, and the start line is just to the left, out of shot

I went outside to sit in the shade, and to be a part of the proceedings, even if I couldn’t do much. Here’s the Buvette to the right, with all the organisers sitting down to their sausage & chips meal. As you can see, all the Cyclos were wearing their cycle shirts (red/yellow/green blobs under the pergola)

For some reason there were two gentlemen dressed up in women’s clothing…as is often the way. What is it with French mean dressing as women?!

And not even “sexy” women. Les Dawson, eat your heart out!

Later on, the teams were introduced to the rather small crowd of spectators. These are young riders, making their way through the rankings, in local, regional teams for the moment, but looking to make it to the big teams who ride in the international competitions. There was a team from Martinique, for example, one of the DOM/TOMS*, and other regional teams.

Here you can see one of the teams being introduced. This team includes the current wearer of the Green jersey, which is the leader in the points competition – usually (but not always) a sprinter. Points are awarded for coming 1st, 2nd etc in each day’s racing, but there are usually intermediate sprints included in the race route, allowing those who are fastest over a certain distance during the race to gain more points.

At precisely the correct time, our Mayor was given the honour of starting the race, and the riders rolled away

By now I was flagging, because of the heat, so I took a couple of photos, and then retired to the cool of the house, where I fell asleep. The teams cycled a loop around the village and its environs, passing through once more about 20 minutes later, and then away into the countryside towards their final destination. I was woken by the motorcycle outriders all hooting their horns to clear the route ahead of the cyclists, but I couldn’t be bothered getting up to wave them on.

Then it was all over! Mr FD and the Cyclos dismantled everything, finishing off the chips-and-sausages that were remaining, getting everything put away, returned to where it should be…and then finally collapsing with a pint glass of juice to watch the football.

Well done the Cyclos!

 

* DOM/TOMS = Départements d’outre-mer, Territoires d’outre-mer, which are French overseas departments and territories. So, just like Loire is a departement in Fraqnce (Departement 42) so there are departements overseas, including Guadeloupe and Martinique. This wikipedia page gives more information

Would you like to join me?

As regular readers will know, I have a little 1 km circuit around the village, that I have endeavoured to do every day – fatigue after chemo permitting. Although I had my last chemo on 7th June it took me until Saturday 16th before I could even face trying the walk. I shuffled round, stopping every 100 metres or so to catch my breath. Every day it has become a little easier, although I have still ended up breathless. Yesterday I paused at the bank to pay in a cheque, and the assistant was obviously very concerned that I was going to collapse all over his nice clean floor. I reassured him that I just needed a moment or two, but he still eyed me with suspicion.

Today I didn’t have a stop for a sit-down – which is a first – and, although I was breathing heavily, it wasn’t quite the “give me oxygen, I’m going to die!” way of breathing that had so concerned the bank employee. But maybe the reason I didn’t need to stop was because I was pausing to take photographs to share with you. So, would you like to join me on my walk?

Say “goodbye” to Millie, who is sitting on yesterday’s junk mail and eying us up balefully…

… leave the house, turn right and right again, and follow the snicket down the back of the church…

… cross the road, and go past the old Hotel Moderne. Sadly, not looking so “moderne” now! I imagine it would be wonderful if it could be renovated! In its heyday, St Just had over 20 hotels, as people would come from Roanne, and further afield, for the fresh mountain air. There was a sanitorium as well for those needing recovery from lung illnesses. Roanne is the nearest big town, and, of course, was heavily industrialised.

We continue down the road, and come to this cottage, which I have always liked the look of

There’s often a friendly retriever pup in the front garden, who barks enthusiastically when people go past, but not today. I assume he’s only put outside when his owners are out.

Not all the houses are old fashioned, however. Although St Just was at its busiest during the 20s and 30s, building work has continued to occur around the village. Opposite the cottage there used to be an orchard, with sheep grazing, chickens scurrying around and a large aviary of various fancy birds. However, about two years ago work started on a new Parish centre and, I think, a priest’s house. I don’t quite know the state of play priest-wise, in St Just, but I imagine that if there is a permanent priest based here, he will be in charge of several parishes. At least he has a nice modern house to live in, instead of a draughty old Presbytry!

We continue along this road, saying “bonjour” to a grandfather playing in goal to his grandson (I’m not sure why grandson wasn’t in school. They haven’t broken up for summer yet)  I would have taken a photo of their amazingly neat vegetable patch, but maybe that would have been a bit intrusive as they were playing football right next to it.

The road descends, and one of my favourite views opens up

I’m not sure if you can see it (click on the photo to biggify) but nestling in the trees in the mid ground is the Chateau de Contenson, one of four chateaux in the immediate surrounds. Here is a view of Contenson

The owners are the Rochetaillé family, after whom the square in front of our house is named. This chateau was built in the 1880s, but there has been a chateau of some form on this spot since the 1300s. During WW1 it was a hospital, and in WW2 sheltered resistance fighters. The current owners breed horses, and are very into their horse racing – there are two race courses not too far from here, at Vichy and Feurs.

You can’t see it, but another of the chateaux in the area is in my photo. In the hills facing us are the ruins of the Chateau d’Urfé, which is a lovely place to take visitors, as you can see for miles from the top of the tower. But, anyway, on with our walk…

Another pleasant view of mountains, trees, green!! Well, we have had quite a lot of rain recently.

Turn right again at the junction, and start heading into the centre of the village again. From this road you can look over the “industrial” part of St Just

Here you can see a scierie or wood yard, plus the cheese factory and the velour (velvet) factory.

If you like pepper and garlic, it’s worth seeing if you can find Gaperon cheese; this is one of our local cheeses, as is La Comtesse de Vichy, a triple-crème cheese o rival Brillat-Saverin.

The velour factory is, I believe,  the only remaining factory in France producing this material. It was constructed at the end of the 19th century, and still uses traditional techniques to create the fabric. In fact the velvet used in the Coronation robes of Elizabeth II was made here!

Turning around from this view, we can see the house of our good friends, Louis and Odette

Quite often, their dog Tim-Tim (a hunting spaniel, of some description) will bark at me as I walk past, but not today. They will often look after YoYo, their daughter’s golden retrieber, as well, so there’s quite a cachophony. But all was quiet today.

Continuing back along this road, there’s another view of the church

and we go past the bench where I often have to sit to catch my breath to where there’s one of the many crosses scattered around the area. I know France is/ was a Catholic country, but I’m often amazed at how many little crosses like this there are. I wonder why there are so many – are they relics of a time before the village expanded, and were placed at crossroads as wayside shrines, or waymarkers? This one seems too modern for that…

You can see my bench in the background of this picture, and as I sit there, I often get a whiff of a beautiful scent. I have no idea what it is, but today I tracked it down to this bush, which was humming with the noise of bees, busily collecting nectar.

 

Is it orange blossom? I am no botanist, but it smelt divine.

We turn right again, and the road rises a little. It is this part of the walk that often tires me out so much that I need another sit down at the top, but not today! At the top of the rise, heading into the centre of the village we come across the Mairie:

To help you get your bearings, the church is situated diagonally opposite the Mairie. The bench I usually collapse onto is just outside the door, beneath the flags.

On the wall of the Mairie is proudly displayed this stone plaque:

Between 1940 and 1944 numerous Jewish families found refuge in St Just en Chevalet and its environs.

Tracked and searched for by the occupying forces and the Vichy government they were saved, thanks to the goodness and courage of certain inhabitants.

The descendants of these families honour these citizens who, in full knowledge of the risk they were undertaking, welcomed and hid them, therefopre saving them from certain death.

One of the old neighbours of our friends was a member of one of these families, and told stories of how, when there were rumours of a rafle – a round-up – due to be carried out by the Nazis, the Jewish children who were being hoidden, would be spirited away into the surrounding woods and countryside.

Finally we reach the boulangerie, where I pause to buy a Petrisane, which is a type of baguette. The bakers makes two types, nature and graine (white, or granary) Both are very nice and at 1€ each, they won’t break the bank. I’m not eating them at the moment, as my mouth is still a little sensitive, but I’ll be back chewing on them soon!

In the picture you can see also pizza, sold by the slice, and petits quiches (two types: ham-and-cheese, or tuna-and-tomato) The lurid pink bun-like thing at the top of the counter is a brioche pralinée, another speciality of the area. Brioche is a sweet dough, and the praline is tooth-numbingly sweet as well. To the left of the till, there are mini-brioches pralinées, plus croissants, pains-au-chocolat and other sweet treats. I didn’t photograph the cakes on offer, but there is always a good selection, using seasonal produce – so there are a lot of fraisiers, strawberry tarts, and fruit based gateaux during the summer months. I will sometimes buy one between us for a Sunday treat.

Then it’s back home, to have a refreshing apple-and-elderflower juice drink. And have a sit-down!

I hope you enoyed joining me on my walk.

 

Sweet treats and poetry.

Monique from across the road has just popped in with a little present for me

a box of 6 macarons, strawberry, pistachio, and lemon, two of each flavour. “Just because”, she said.  How kind!

I went to Charlotte’s exhibition of illustrated poems from her writing group yesterday evening – she invited me to the “opening” get together. Friend Cathy was going to come with me, but had an emergency with the battery for the electrics in her caravan; Mr FD was going to come with me, but he’d just got his new bike, and wanted to tinker with it. So I went by myself. I read the poems (needed Google Translate from time to time!) and chose my favourite few. I was introduced to various of Charlotte’s friends, and we all agreed she was a lovely, vibrant person. I took two sips of Cremant de Bourgogne (which tasted horrid) and then abandoned my glass. Then I went home again.

It was quite nice just being out by myself. I’m not sure I’ll make it to Church tomorrow though, but I am going to Clermont on Tuesday, to catch up with friends & colleagues at ILS. I might do a bit of unnecessary shopping too!

Long ago, in time…

A comment that Michelle made, on my Wedding Anniversary post, has inspired this post. She said: I LOVE seeing old photos like this! 

And so…

For our 25th Wedding Anniversary, back in 2010, we had a party, and made a montage of various photos taken from our photo albums. I used to love putting together scrapbooks of our holidays, and so in order to make the montage a friend & I raided the albums. I always meant to put the photos back in the books, but 8 years after the event, it’s still on the wall:

As always, you can click on the pictures to biggify them…

So I thought I’d share a few of the photos with you.

1985

This one is another from our Wedding Day – a closer up of me with my Nana’s hairstyle and Deirdre Barlow glasses. (For those who don’t know, Deirdre Barlow was a character in the long-running soap Coronation Street, well-known for her huge glasses)

She had a difficult life, and spent a lot of time on screen looking anguished!

I’m happy to say, I look less anguished that Deirdre in my wedding photos!

The next two photos I chose because I thought I knew exactly when & where they were taken, but on looking through the Holiday scrapbooks I see I was wrong!

1992

Here is a very youthful looking Mr FD. This was taken when we were on holiday in France, in a village called Montferrat (which we revisited last year) in the Var region of France. This photo was taken on 17th August, in the village of Montaureaux – we had spent the day at a Medieval Fair, where I had painted a pot (which I still have!) which was then fired in a Medieval-like way. We booked to eat the “Menu du repas des Tavernes” eaten on long tables underneath the trees. I stuck the menu into my scrapbook, and read that we ate:

  • Sur un lit de feuilles de salades variées du potager de Monsieur le Duc, Riz de Piémont aux raisins secs. Melange paysan avec poisson au sénevé, graines de Turquie, poivrons, concombres, et tomates de nos campagnes (Served on a bed of mixed salad leaves from the vegetable plot of the Duke, rice from Piedmont with raisins. Peasant mix (?) with fish with senevé mustard, grains from Turkey (which is what sweetcorn was known as in the Middle Ages – or, alternatively, what the menu devisers chose to call sweetcorn!), red peppers, cucumber and local tomatoes)
  • Roti de lapin des terres du Seigneur de Tournon, tranche de boeuf cuit à la braise, accompagnée des sauces au genièvre, cannelle et oignonnets ( Roast rabbit, from the land of the Lord of Tournon, slice of braised beef, accompanied by a sauce of juniper, cinnamon, and little onions) – I’m not sure whether we had to choose one or theother, or whether we got both!
  • Tartouste aux sarments, qu’enrobe une crème à la ciboulette ( a type of young potato, covered with a chive cream – I suspect these may have been baked potatoes, as often  these are served with a chive cream here in France)
  • Fromage à la Province Briarde (Cheese from Briarde)
  • Galette Paysanne aux fruits rouges ( Red fruit tart)

It was at this place that this photo was taken of me, presumably somewhere at the top of the Chateau of the Duke:

and here’s a photo from t’internet of the village:

Do you have places that you associate with pieces of music? For me, I remember a long straight road back from this village to our holiday appartment in Montferrat, and that road is associated with the Proclaimers’ “Letter from America”. I don’t know why it should be that those two things are interlinked, why I should particularly remember the song being played there, at that moment, as we no doubt listened to it several times during the holiday, but when I think of the song, I think of the road!

1998

This photo was taken on 20th August, while we were on a family holiday with Mr FD’s side of the family. We stayed in a village called Ambazac, in the Limousin region of France. That was the year I paraglided from the top of Puy de Dome! We shared a gite together (me & Mr FD, Mr FD’s brother & SiL, and MiL & FiL) We generally had a good time, partly because we didn’t do everything together. I find out that (either altogether, or just me & Mr FD) among our activities, we visited the town of Limoges, we went to the very sobering place that is Oradour-sur-Glane , we went on cycle rides (I seem to have actually chosen to go on quite long rides, which surprises me!), we went on a steam train, we went to a folk festival at Confolens, and we saw the start of the Tour de Limousin.

I particularly remember the day (and the following night) of the train ride. You see, my BiL is diabetic, and, although he manages his illness well, needs to eat at regular intervals to avoid either hyperglycemia, or hypoglycemia ( hypo is when the  blood sugar levels are too high, hyper…is when the blood sugar levels are too low) We took the train in the afternoon, to Eymoutiers, planning to eat in a restaurant there; however, there was some sort of festival going on, and all the restaurants were booked up. The only sustenance that was on offer was wine and chips. Which we partook of, before (presumably) getting the train home again.

That night, we were awoken by a terrible groaning noise, and lots of thrashing about from the bedroom next to ours. We rushed in, to find SiL (who is quite small and slight) trying to force Lucozade into BiL (who is neither small nor slight) who was fighting her off with some force – while still asleep! He was having some sort of diabetic crisis. Finally everything settled down, but of course it took us a long time to get back to sleep afterwards. In the morning, everyone was very bleary eyed, except for BiL who declared that he’d had the best night’s sleep that he’d had for a long time!! Good for you, was the reply.

Anyway, back to the photo. My scrapbook informs me that the photo was taken at the Restaurant La Chanterelle, not too far from the gite. That night I ate:

  • Mousse de Saint Jacques (scallop mousse)
  • foie gras
  • entrecote (steak)
  • fromage
  • Iles Flottantes (Floating Islands – a dessert made of creme anglaise, soft meringue, caramel sauce. Like this:

Well, I’ve really enjoyed this short trip down memory lane, and  I think I may well be doing some more similar posts!

*Meh*

I want to write a blog post, but I have no idea what to write about. Does anyone have anything they’d like to know about me? Do please put a question in the comments section.

What else?

These are the things I have done so far today:

  • got up a bit late (8.30)
  • drank half a peach/banana/raspberry smoothie
  • went to the Post Office to post a zentangle commission (earning a bit of money for this one!)
  • went for my 1.25 km walk (only one pause to catch my breath today, but still very slow!)
  • bought bread
  • drank the rest of the smoothie
  • faffed about on the computer
  • sorted out my knickers & socks
  • saw the podiatrist, as where she’d cut my ingrowing toenails was looking a little infected.
  • had lunch (chicken rillette sandwich, bowl of tomato/carrot/sweet potato/lentil soup, slice of pannetone)
  • watched (and snoozed through) an episode of “Bargain Hunt”, that I didn’t really want to watch.

Oh! The excitement!! I can hardly bear it!

On the agenda for this afternoon & this evening (possibly):

  • finish a rather tedious book. I’d give up on it, but it’s a NetGalley book, and I am obliged to write a review. I’m not impressed by it, unfortunately.
  • have a snooze, as I didn’t sleep very well last night. Although having a snooze probably won’t help me to sleep well tonight!
  • start another zentangle (does anyone want one? Let me know! I prefer doing one with a purpose)
  • half heartedly tidy up my desk.
  • have dinner (the rest of the lasagne from Saturday)
  • watch some TV.

I’m feeling a bit “meh” at the moment…not really motivated to do anything much…partly the weather (it is alternating between grey and drizzly, grey and raining, and grey and pissing down.) and partly the effects of treatment. I have my appointment about radiotherapy on Wednesday – I’ll find out when the radiotherapy starts, and how many sessions I’ll be having.

Still, lots to look forward to…

  • going to Annecy at the end of June with the Cycle Club – & meeting up with Chomeuse & her Chou!
  • Mum & my sister coming, at the beginning of September
  • going away (probably Italy) at the end of September
  • going to Convention – with the excitement of electing a new Bishop)  – in Waterloo, in October
  • possibly going to Amsterdam in October half term
  • going to Christmas Markets in Strasbourg at the beginning of December
  • starting back at work in October – things will be different as M. Khodri, the director of the language school, is retiring. The new directors may want to employ me (or not!) on a different basis. We shall see.

On this day…

Actually, it’s more “in this month”, as since I organised my photos I’ve lost the dates of some of them

 

2014: This was given to me by the daughter of one of my students. He was a potter, and one day it was school holidays, and his daughter was staying with him. He couldn’t leave her alone, so brought her along to his English lesson. We played some games and Papa showed off his English! To say “Thank You”, she made this cat, painted with a happy face on one side, and a sad/angry face on the other:

 

 

*****

2015: Here I am on the top of Puy de Dome. In fact, I know the date of this one as it was taken the day after our 30th Wedding Anniversary celebtations, on 26th May. We spent the night at Hotel Radio, in Chalmalieres, just above Clermont Ferrand. Here’s my blog post about it, on my other blog.

*****

2016: I think this was the card I made for Friend Jane’s “Christian birthday” – she and I made our commitment to God round about the same time, and we send each other cards every year (although sometimes I’m later than I should be!)

*****

2017: another card, this time made for a student of mine who was getting married. And here’s a bonus picture of me when I was younger, so much younger…

2018: Well, today, I’m languishing in bed (yes, another scheduled post!) so no photo for today! Sorry about that.

This year we are going to postpone Wedding Anniversary celebrations…Friend Alison gave us a voucher for a meal at a local hotel for Christmas, and we had decided to go out for dinner. However, with me losing my sense of taste there really isn’t much point gpoing to a restaurant, so we’ll put that meal off until I can taste again!