I came, I saw, I had a MAGNIFICENT time!!

All week we had been watching the weather in the UK – the “Beast from the East” causing chaos, with drivers stranded, airports shut down, villages cut off…but all the time, the little north west corner of the British Isles seemed to miss the worst of the weather. Then Storm Emma started romping up the west side of the UK…but veered over to Ireland just before reaching the top of Wales.

We had to get up early, at 5.00 am to drive over to Lyon, but I’d actually woken at 2.30 and not got back to sleep. I was actually much perkier than I’d imagined I’d be. We set out to Lyon airport hoping that the plane would not be cancelled. It wasn’t even delayed!!

Wearing a double surgical mask and latex gloves, to protect from infection – as these days were the days when my white blood cell count would be at its lowest, and I would be most vulnerable to infection – I cut a slightly pathetic picture. We comandeered a wheelchair at the airport and Mr FD pushed me through. I’m very glad, as it was quite a trek to get to the correct terminal. We went through security (surprisingly there was no queue at all) – I caused some problems as I explained about the stent for chemo, and they wanted to see proof of this. It was in my handbag, which had already gone through the scanner, so people were running aroud to fetch it. Then I had to be scanned with a hand held scanner rather than go through the walk-through scanner. It all took a bit longer than usual, but we had plenty of time. As I was in a wheelchair we were allowed through passport control ahead of others (huzzah!) and soon got settled on the plane. I plugged in my earphones and listened to a podcast for the flight. At Manchester we waited until everyone had left the plane, and then climbed the steps into the terminal building. As I entered the bhuilding I slipped on some very wet rubbery matting, and fell down: luckily I went quite slowly, and nothing was hurt, but the cabin crew and pilot who were just behind were very helpful and sympathetic.  Also luckily, a wheelchair had been left at the top of the steps and we were encouraged to use it – which meant priority going through border control!! Although we’d been so slow there weren’t many people left waiting anyway. Then we took the time to organise a wheelchair for the return journey, at Manchester airport. Later on, Mr FD contacted Lyon to organise assistance at that end too.

Mum had said she’d pay for car hire, so we went andpicked up the car, then drove to mum’s, in Liverpool. We had lunch, and then my sister arrived from Leicester (not held up by snow at all), and my brother from Stokesley (near Middlesborough) Despite the fact there was still a lot of snow on the east side of the country, he had encountered no problems with the trains getting over. It was lovely seeing them all! We sat and chatted all afternoon, as I had to take it easy, while Wonderful Mr FD went on a mission to buy, and then put in place, a new toilet seat for mum. We had dinner and then, as I’d been awake so early, suddenly fatigue hit me. I was in bed and asleep byabout 9.30, I think!

On Friday evening, we had hastily arranged a meet-up for lunch with my nephew Conor (Judy’s son) and my niece Rose (Mike’s daughter), her husband and baby, over in Manchester. So after relaxing all morning, while everyone else went out shopping for a disabled friend of mum’s, or taking things to the tip, or buying supplies of logs, we all set out for lunch.

Here we are at Croma Pizza, passing Billy the Baby round the table – except not to my end, as I had to stay away from babies (hotbeds of infection, apparently. And Billy was quite snuffly).

There were some, let’s say less traditional pizzas on the menu, but I decided to have

Baked garlic mushrooms, served with (quite a lot of) rocket and a slice of olive bread

Then I chose another starter for a main course, which was a chorizo and Bury black pudding bruschetta, with a goats’ cheese and beetroot side salad. It was very nice.

and with it, I drank a delicious Manchester craft beer, called “Manchester Skyline”

For dessert I chose a “Banoffi Mess” – basically Eton Mess, but made with bananas, meringue, ginger biscuits and cream, with toffee sauce. It was a bit of a disappointment – masses of cream, big chunks of meringue, two slices of banana and one crumb of ginger biscuit. It let down what was an excellent meal, and although I did mention it to the waiter no more was said about it.

Afterwards, Judy and mum went back to Liverpool, while Mike, Mr FD and I went to spend the afternoon with Rose, David and Billy.

Billy in his bouncy chair

I spent some of the time “resting my eyes” but it was lovely just chatting with them, and watching them play with Billy. I kept my mask and gloves on for the whole time, to avoid any infection. And then Mike, Mr FD & I set off for the Bill Bailey comedy gig – this was our Christmas present for Mike. We arrived quite early, but that was fine. I sat in my seat and “powered down” – that is to say, pulled my hat and hood over my eyes and just sat quietly with my eyes closed, relaxing and conserving energy.

Here we are, after my powering down, waiting for the show to start.

It was a very good show – Bill Bailey is a slightly surreal comic, but we thoroughly enjoyed the show. Here is a review of the show from The GuardianOurs was a little different, set in Manchester rather than Southend, but – ad libs aside – it was basically the same. We got home at about 11.30, and we went straight to bed.

On Sunday morning, mum went to church, but I decided it wasn’t worth expending more “spoons” than necessary, considering we had the Elbow gig in the evening. ( The “spoon theory” is a disability metaphor and neologism used to explain the reduced amount of energy available for activities of daily living and productive tasks that may result from disability or chronic illness. … A person who runs out of spoons has no choice but to rest until their spoons are replenished. from Wikipedia) So Judy, Mike & I looked at an old photo album, discussing who the various members of our family were, as Mike has spent quite a lot of time researching our family tree. Unfortunately, while we have great grandparents who were Irish, this is not enough to entitle us to an Irish passport. Mr FD played about with mum’s computer, organising our boiarding passes and assistance at Lyon airport for the journey home.

After lunch, Mr FD and I set off for the hotel in Manchester that we’d booked for Sunday night, about a mile away from Manchester Arena, where the gig was being held. For some reason, the Sat Nav didn’t want to work in Manchester city centre and we couldn’t find the hotel anywhere. We were just about to start a blazing row when Mr FD said “Look!” and there it was, in front of us. Getting to it was another kettle of fish, due to one way systems and taxi/bus lanes, so in the end we parked the car in a carpark and walked! Again, I saved my spoons, while Mr FD went to try to get the car to the hotel – another difficult time, but he finally made it.

We took the tram to Victoria Station, which is next door to the Arena, and Mr FD went to the Box Office, while I sat with a coffee in the station buffet. We grabbed a bite to eat at Greggs (I had a cheese and onion pasty.) and then headed to the Arena. You may remember the terrorist attack that took place in Manchester in May last year. I had imagined it taking place in a large plaza area outside the Arena, but when I saw how narrow the walkway and foyer area are, it is no surprise that the effects were so devastating. There was good security – only ticket holders being allowed up to the walkway, and then passing through X-ray machines at the entrance to the Arena itself.

Again, we were early, so I “powered down” until the support act, John Grant, came on. And then – huzzah! – the main event. Which was excellent! (Review from the Manchester Evening News)

Mr FD’s photo from during “Mirrorball”


After the show we left by a fairly quiet exit, and were lucky enough to be able to hail a taxi straight away. It was a 5/10 minute drive back to the hotel. We thought about going to the bar for a drink, buit they’d stopped serving – and really, that was a good thing, as I was dropping. Even though I was buzzing!!

The next day, we had a full Northern breakfast – sausage, bacon, fried bread, fried potatoes, mushrooms, tomato, black pudding, baked beans, fried egg (which I’m not allowed to have) – plus trimmings (toast-and-marmalade, juice, coffee) and then made our way to the airport, pausing at Asda for a few last minute purchases of the DVD of “Death of Stalin”, some magazines, Zantac indigestion tablets & Tiger Balm (cheaper in the UK!)

Mr FD wheeled me through the airport, on the pre-booked wheelchair, which gave us Fast Track through security and a designated seating area in the very crowded departure lounge. I bought some huge slabs of chocolate (CDM!)

Then we were given a heads-up to the departure gate, so we were there before everyone else, and a very nice gentleman then wheeled me to the plane, so we were in our seats and luggage stowed before the usual scrum. At Lyon, we waited until everyone had got off, then were met by a man with a wheelchair, who wheeled me swiftly through the terminal. When we reached the back of the queue for border control, a quick Excusez-moi! and we were fast tracked through Passport Control. Pausing only to pick up the hold luggage, the man insisted on wheeling me right to the car in the car park. And we headed home, arriving at 6.30 pm.

Today I’m a little fatigued, but not too bad. I slept until about 8.30, when the nurse arrived for my weekly blood test. I wonder if it will show my white blood cells are down?

It was the most amazing weekend. Mr FD was a complete star throughout, looking after me, organising everything and allowing me to just rest and to enjoy myself. Even if I have caught an infection (and I was very careful, using hand sanitiser after every bathroom visit, in between bathroom visits, after touching stuff…Etc etc. Plus my double mask protection and latex gloves in crowds & public places) it was worth it!! It did me the most enormous amount of good.

And thank you all so much for your positive messages of support – they have been very much appreciated.


Christmas Doings 2: Boxing Day

There was an organised walk from church planned for the afternoon, and Mr FD was up for it, so the morning was spent doing various enjoyable things – reading, blogging, listening to the radio etc. Then, after a hurried piece of cheese on toast at 11.15, we set out to borrow our friends’ dog, Marvin, as we thought he would enjoy the walk. Then we drove down to Clermont.

Marvin was very well-behaved in the car: he sat in the footwell, and quivered. I stroked him a lot to reassure him, and finally he settled down between my feet.

We arrived at the car park where we were all meeting, but had to hang around for quite a while, as other people who were coming got lost. Finally everyone arrived and we set off

We headed up the Vallée de Sans Souci, to the Squirrels’ Cascade

It was lovely – people swapped walking partners, as we went, and Marvin had a great time with Clio, the labrador. There was a puppy with us too, Narda, but she was kept on the lead as she was rather over excited by the whole event! She’s the dog being lifted up in the photo above.

When we arrived back at the car, Rob (our rector) & Caireen (his wife) invited us back to the house, “for some leftovers” We were expecting a turkey sandwich and a cup of tea – and ended up having a delicious 4-course meal! Red pepper & sweet potato soup, turkey dinner, with all the trimmings, cheese, and mince pies! Goodness me!

Marvin was thoroughly spoiled and loved the attention. He isn’t allowed on the furniture (except his chair) at home, but here he was positively encouraged onto the sofa!

He was given a bowlful of scraps to eat as well. Rob and Caireen would have adopted him on the spot if they could have done! He was splendidly well-behaved.

And after a lovely meal, we drove home, arriving in time to feed the cats, who sniffed my jeans very suspiciously.

A really nice day, with really nice people.

Mr FD, me and Marvin

My consultant phoned me yesterday – both the bone scan and the organ scan were normal, showing no signs that the cancer has spread!

I know we’re not out of the woods yet, but the relief that both Mr FD and I felt was enormous. Thank you, God.

Budapest Jollies 5: Thursday morning.

We’d investigated a place where it was possible to leave your bags for a small fee, and so after breakfast we vacated the flat. We took various photos of the outside of the building (none of mine were very good, but you’ve seen the angel figure in my first post)

This was the view out of the flat window, looking down the street towards the Synagogue.

Having left the bags we took the tram to the covered market, where we wanted to buy a couple of last minute presents, and then the plan was to climb Gelert Hill to get views of the city. Unfortunately the clouds were so low that we couldn’t see the top of Gelert Hill, so that rather knocked that idea on the head.

Rather aimlessly, we walked along the river bank, admiring buildings across the river and chatting.

We found a shopping centre to explore (especially the toilets!) and then headed back to collect our bags, buy a sandwich and catch the express bus to the airport. Final shopping in the Duty Free to use up our HUFs and then we parted, Jane to go to Gatwick and me to Lyon.

My flight was fine, with all the connections home going smoothly. I was met at Roanne station by Mr FD.

It was a really enjoyable few days. I would definitely go back to Budapest and recommend the airbnb that we had. It was on Wesselényi Utca, but unfortunately doesn’t appear to be showing up on the site at the moment. It had a double bed and a fairly comfortable double sofa bed too. And generally, all mod-cons except a kettle and a corkscrew!

Budapest Jollies Part 1

Hello everyone!

Having told you about the “spiritual” side of my time in Budapest, I thought I’d share some of my not-so-spiritual time!

I arrived on the Thursday, the day before the retreat was due to start. There was another lady, Edith, who was in the same situation as me, so we arranged to meet at the airport, to share a taxi to the Retreat House. When I found her however, she’d already spoken to someone and had the route by public transport all worked out! By myself I don’t think I’d’ve been brave enough but with Edith we were intrepid! There was some moments of panic and tension when we weren’t sure (a) where to get off the bus and (b) if indeed the bus was travelling in the right direction but that got sorted by a helpful young woman with a GPS and good English!

The following day I wanted to just wander around Budapest, while Edith wanted to climb Castle Hill and various other high points – she is a lot fitter than I, so we travelled in on the bus together (we knew what we were doing this time!) and then split up. I wandered aimlessly but enjoyably around the Jewish Quarter, admiring the Grand Synagogue from the outisde, but not wanting to really “visit” anywhere, as I knew I’d be meeting up with my friend after the retreat.

I took photos of things that I thought might inspire some Zentangle patterns:

I thought the pattern at the top of the door rather interesting

This window on the Jewish Archive centre was also interesting

and I really liked this pattern around a window.

And I was right: they did inspire a piece of Zentangle art:

Not the best photo, but I think you can see how some of the patterns have been incorporated into the design.

I particularly admired one building, with a huge angelic figure outside it:

I can’t help wondering what the flats in these kind of buildings are like – shabbily chic? Bang up-to-date? Who knows…,

I paused for lunch, choosing a place that advertised Craft beer, and had Hungarian sausage, coleslaw and sweet potato chips, plus a beer.

As I was getting tired I decided to make my way back to the Retreat House, and spend some time reading & zentangling. Then the other participants arrived, and we started the Retreat.

On the Sunday, there were four of us who were staying longer, so we shared a taxi into the centre of the city, where Lee, Laurie and Paula had their hotel. I had the address of the airbnb which Jane & I had booked, but other than that had no idea where it was in relation to the hotel. I was more than willing to catch buses etc, although happily,  when we arrived at the hotel Lee’s GPS proved that the flat was just about 10 minutes walk away. So off I went, trundling my suitcase behind me, and finally found the address – amazingly, in the block that I admired on Thursday!!

Jane had already arrived, so we spent time catching up, which was lovely. We are lucky enough to have one of those friendships where you can just pick up as though you saw each other last week. But after an hour or so’s chatting we decided to go exploring.

We wandered – finding a small Christmas market (about 10 stalls) and really, really hoping that that wasn’t it. We did, however, have mulled wine and chimney cake:

Both of which were delicious

We wandered around and visited St Stephen’s basilica, rather lovely in the late evening gloaming – lots of candlelight glinting from the gold decoration within. Very hushed, with some meandering organmusic being played. It was a delight to sit in the beauty, with my good friend, who has been a Christian for as long as I have, in a place where Christians hgave worshipped for, oh hundreds of years (or so I thought. Eventually discovering that in fact the Basilica was relatively modern, being finished in 1905!)

We strolled around various souvenir and craft shops, already planning our future purchases – what fun to be with someone who enjoys browsing! Mr FD hates it, but in fact Jane & I did a lot of browsing together!!

We decided to eat in a Hungarian restaurant, and had Goulash soup, followed by chicken paprikash, and then pancakes. I meant to take photos, but forgot! A stroll back to the flat, via a small supermarket, to buy coffee, tea, cereal, milk and orange juice for breakfast,and wine, not for breakfast, and we spent the evening relaxing, chatting and planning the next day’s adventures. We were also very happy to discover that the Miserable Christmas Market that we discovered was only an offshoot from the main Christmas Market , located in another square. Tomorrow was planned!!

And you’ll hear about it in another post.

If you’ve got this far, you may be wondering about the Big & Scary news – well, I’ve been biopsied (once) and I have been told that I have a pre-cancerous nodule in my breast. Everyone is very keen to tell me that there’s nothing to worry about, and that, more-than-likely, it can be dealt with through surgery, and possibly radiotherapy. I have an appointment to see a highly-regarded breast specialist on Monday, and we will know more about timescales then. I will also have a more invasive biopsy to make sure.

Strangely, I have not been scared, or even really worried; “mildly concerned” might cover it. I have felt surrounded by love, concern and prayers, and God has never felt closer. All this year, I have believed that there was something big that God was going to ask of me, and I knew that the Retreat was going to play an important part in helping me deal with it. When I was asked to serve on the Transition Committee (involved in the search for a new Bishop for the Convocation) I thought that might be the Thing. However, more and more, I think that this health problem is the Thing. And the peace and renewal of an understanding of God’s love for me that was the main focus of the Retreat (for me) has really upheld me through these past weeks of uncertainty, and will continue to surround me through whatever is to come.

As I said in my last post, our mantra is “It is what it is (and we now know what it is), it will be what it will be, and we will get through it together”. Please, should you be of a praying ilk, would you continue to pray.



Where have I been? Wiesbaden!

Well, I was clever enough to schedule my Desiderata posts (yes, I know…it’s not actually that clever at all!) for while I was away but the weekend of 19 – 22nd October I was in Wiesbaden. This was for the annual convention of the Convocation of the Episcopal Church in Europe and it was a great weekend.

The business part was fairly straightforward, and quite interesting at points – finding out what the various commissions and committees have been doing, how churches have been using grants and so on. The Bishop of the Convocation has tendered his resignation, so we are planning for the work of finding a new Bishop. I am on the Transition Committee – this will be the organisational powerhouse (?!) after the candidates have been selected. It’s rather exciting, but a little daunting too. I’m not sure quite what skills I hjave to offer yet, but I’m waiting to find out. At the moment the committee seems to be full to the gunnels of people who are willing to organise us all, so I’m sitting back to let it all go on around me. It will become clear later on, I’m sure.

The hotel where I stayed was really nice: modern, clean, comfortable – and not too expensive! I’d recommend the Hotel Motel One to anyone.

It was a tad “over-designed” in places – the seats for breakfast weren’t very comfy (but very stylish!) but that’s my only criticism. It was situated 1.5 km from the conference centre, so I was walking 3 km a day without thinking. And more when I had to return to the Centre to meet up during the evening. According to Map My Walk, my average speed was just under 13 min/km, but there was one time when I did 1.8 km at 10 min/km – I had fallen asleep in the hotel room, and was late for the bus to take us to dinner! I arrived at the meeting place at the same time as the buses – having missed Solemn Evensong.

The  meals out were great – the first night we went in groups to different restaurants. I chose a South American restaurant, and had a delicious steak! The Bishop’s Dinner (a bit posh) was in a restaurant overlooking the city, and we took this charming funicular up to the top:

Unfortunately, as it was dark, the views weren’t so great, but the twinkly lights were pretty. The restaurant was lovely – a buffet of cold starters, and then a huge choice of barbecued items, with potatoes and ratatouille. Dessert was ice cream, red berries and crème anglaise. The Bishop made a speech, we toasted people, and had a lovely time.

The Saturday restaurant was amazing – slightly bonkers, with various farming implements hanging from the ceiling, a showman of a chef, where you took your raw ingredients to a hot plate where they were cooked in front of you. The entertainment was from a talented group from the Wiesbaden Episcopal church. Sadly, I cannot find anything on t’internet but it was fab!

But, I think the highlight of the weekend had to be Revd Canon Michael Hunn, special envoy from the Presiding Bishop, Michael Curry. He gave two great keynote speeches.

The first was about The Jesus Movement – the name makes me cringe a little, but apparently it is the name Biblical scholars give to the very early church, before it was a church, when it was a group of people trying to live the way they had been shown by Jesus What this means for us now is explained in this link

The second talk that Michael Hunn gave started as he explained his son is a jazz musician. He compared being a leader in the church, and, in fact, being anyone in the church, to being a jazz musician.

In the jazz group, the music may seem improvised, but every player knows the basic tune so well that it is in their heart. They can play it in any key, at any moment. It is embedded within. So when the musicians play together they all have the same music in them.

In a jazz piece, the players then take a solo – they improvise and riff around the tune, always with the same basic melody, but playing it in their own individual style. A trombone player doesn’t play it as a pianist does, a saxophonist is different to a trumpeter…but whatever the style, whatever the instrument, the melody is always there at the heart of what they play. Each musician has their solo, when the rest of the band lets the other shine, and do their bit. Then after the solo the other musicians take up the tune, supporting and listening to the main player, almost throwing the tune to one another – again being “in tune” with everyone on the group is really important for this.

But all the way through, the important thing is that the tune, the melody, is embedded in everyone so they can hardly help but to play.

It was a really inspiring weekend.

And in a couple of weeks I’ll be in Budapest being inspired again – I hope!

This last week, my mum & my brother have been staying too. that was nice. I’ll tell you about it another time. I need to sort out October’s bills!

Last week’s struggles (!)

So what did I get up to?

On MONDAY evening, I went with Friend Cathy to a Nordic walking group – sadly there were only the two of us, plus the leader, so she doesn’t think she’ll carry the group on. It’s a shame, as it was at a good time: between 6.30 & 7.30, so not too late to have dinner afterwards. There is a group on Monday mornings, which I might try to get to when I’m not working.

I did find there was more to it than “walking with poles” and Laure, the leader, was less than complimentary about my “body conciousness”. However with arthritis in both  knees, a wobbly right ankle and foot, plus a crumbling disc or two, it doesn’t matter how concious I am of my body, I know that it hurts from time to time! She suggested I went to her exercise class on Monday evening, but I can’t see me keeping it up TBH. So I won’t.

So, on Monday I did 1 hours Nordic walking.

WEDNESDAY: 2 km round the Port in Roanne. From this aerial shot, you can see my route

Start at the car park in the top left hand side of the picture, down the right of the basin, over the footbridge (1 km) then down the other side, between the canal and the river. A little bit extra at the end to make it up to 2 km. There! Done at a pace of 11.55 mins/km. Not too shabby. But not too quick, either.

I know I should have gone for a walk on either Thursday or Friday, as both days I was only working half day, but somehow I just couldn’t be arsed.

On Saturday it was lovely weather outside – inside the house it was cold. The house, which is old & stone, has taken on its winter chill, and the warm sun outside wasn’t making much impact, so I thought I should ghet out into the sun. I borrowed Mr FD’s walking poles, (a little too tall for me, and jammed into their height. I couldn’t twist the mechanism to change the height.) and headed out.

I completed 4.35 km, and although my pace is down on Map My Walk as 12.58 minutes/km, I reckon I can take about 1 minute off that, for pauses made when taking off my jumper (hot!!), getting tangled in my poles, stopping for a breath and forgetting to press “Pause Workout” and so on. Even so, 11.58 isn’t great, but with the poles I felt I’d had more of a workout than without them. They do also mean I seem to walk faster – though that may not be the case!

The only problem is that, due to being shaky on my balance, I do have to watch the ground constantly, when I’m walking off road, which means I don’t get to look at the countryside. Which is a bit sad.

I thought about going out on Sunday too, but got very involved in drawing Celtic knots – fascinating work! – so didn’t.

Piddling with rain today, so I’m not going out in that, and working all tomorrow. However, a cancelled lesson on Wednesday means that I have time for a longer walk. That will be the one I did the Wednesday before last, round the Gravel pits

You can’t quite see it all on this photo, as the route goes round the lower lake (bottom right hand corner) then up between the river & the lake, to where you see the first tree lined path splitting the lakes. Past the horses in the fields, and the house/visitor centre (R-H side of pic) and back to the car. 3.28 km, which I did last time at 11.53 min/km. Let’s see if I can shave a couple of seconds off that, shall we?!

Crafting and Umbrellas

Not “crafting umbrellas” – I wasn’t making umbrellas, you understand!

While the English on this Lolcats annoys me – the cat left his umbrella at home, he didn’t forget his umbrella at home – it is such a perfect illustration that I felt I had to use it.

On Thursday morning the sky was an ominous grey when I left the house, so I grabbed my waterproof. Which doesn’t have a hood. By the time I left the company where I had been working all morning, ready to drive to ILS (the language school where I work), it was pouring down. Torrential. The car park for ILS is about a 3 minute walk from the offices, so I knew I was going to get soaked, even with my waterproof.

And I didn’t have my umbrella with me.

I had forgotten it.

I had left it at home.

So I decided to nip into Gifi and buy a cheap one. Which I did.

When I arrived at ILS, the rain had reduced itself to a drizzle. By the time I parked the car (it was a tight fit, and the car is big!) and taken a phone call, the rain was spitting and spotting. By the time I reached ILS, the sun had come out and it was blue skies for the rest of the day. AND I found that I had my umbrella at the bottom of my capacious handbag after all.

I hadn’t forgotten it.

I hadn’t left it at home.

But finally, no umbrella was necessary anyway. Sigh.

On a cheerier note, it was the birthday of Friend Alison’s daughter. She is reaching pre teenager-hood. So I gave her a voucher for H&M, two sparkly nail varnishes, and a pair of delightful cat socks, which someonehad given me, but which (sadly) were too small. Like these:

And, of course, I made her a card. I took inspiration from one of the many card making magazines that I buy in the UK. I usually buy them for the free gifts, as a lot of the cards that they demonstrate use cutting dies, or heat guns, or embossing glitter, or this…or that…which I don’t have.This time, I decided to find a card I liked, then try to replicate it with the materials I had.

The instructions that were given were for using fabrics, and sewing machines, and other stuff. I “translated” it into using paper and glue…and I made this:

this picture taken without a flash

this taken with a flash

I used papers from my stash, most of which I’ve been given, plus lots of ephemera/ commercial embellishments that I have bought in Noz. The little bronze embellishment was given to me by Monique across the road – she gave me a bundle of little brass charms from her antique shop, which I have been slowly using on cards. This one shows the Eiffel Tower.

There is a pocket on the card, into which I popped some motivational messages:

  • You are braver than you believe, stronger than you appear and more talented than you ever dreamed possible
  • You are a strong girl – never forget that.
  • Nothing is impossible
  • You are pear-fect

I think she liked it all. I was certainly rather pleased with the card – even though it was a tyad too front-heavy so you had to prop it open quite carefully!