POWER TO THE PEOPLE!

Does anyone remember Robert Lindsay as Wolfie in “Citizen Smith”?

It was a TV series at the end of the 70s; Wolfie was the self-proclaimed leader of the revolutionary Tooting Popular Front (the TPF, merely a small bunch of his friends), the goals of which were “Power to the People” and “Freedom for Tooting”. He was, in fact, a bit of a loser, who did not very much to reach these goals!

I’ve been starting to bring my own “Power(points) to the people” as I’ve been putting together Power Point Presentations to go on t’internet before our Church services. A mixture of images, Bible verses, and quiet music, lasting about 7 or 8 minutes, we hope these will (a) tell people that they’ve logged onto the right place and (b) help people to settle into a more worshipful frame of mind. Otherwise there is slightly inane “chat” on the Chat function. It developed out of my Good Friday meditatative service – basically a PPP with music, readings, pictures and poems. It was well received; and gave me a bit of confidence. I’ve been exploring the “Design” settings, and the “add video” options, and I’ve had fun putting them together. I think I’ll be quite sorry (in a very small way) when we go back to “real” church, and I won’t get the opportunity to do them again!

But I wonder if, as we’re so spread out as a congregation, whether a mid-week Zoom meditative service – basically a PPP that someone has put together (me! me!) would be welcome. I’d enjoy doing that, I think. I shall suggest it, I think.

Our Zoom Church meetings have been going well – they’re not very technical or wizzy; you can’t see the speaker (so I may try to put together a PPP for when I’m giving the sermon next week, if I feel brave enough!!), but they are something that keeps us all worshipping together. And when we unmute, and switch on our cameras for “coffee time” afterwards, it’s chaotic but good to see everyone!

If you’d like to join us, let me know in the comments, and I can give you the link for Sunday.

Poems V

This one wasn’t one that was sent to me, but one I found when looking for resources for my Good Friday service…

Here it is, on Good Friday (with apologies that I cannot get the breaks in the right places.):

A QUIET ROAR

 

one

 

he lays his left hand along the beam

hand that moulded clay into fluttering birds

hand that cupped wild flowers to learn their peace
hand that stroked the bee’s soft back and touched death’s sting

two

 

he stretches his right hand across the grain
hand that blessed a dead corpse quick
hand that smeared blind spittle into sight
hand that burgeoned bread, smoothed down the rumpled sea
three

he stands laborious

 

sagging, split, homo erectus,
poor bare forked thing
hung on nails like a picture
he is not beautiful
blood sweats from him in rain
far off where we are lost, desert dry
thunder begins its quiet roar
the first drops startle us alive
the cloud no bigger
than a man’s hand
Veronica Zundel 


	

A thought for today

Can I direct you to this sermon, or thought, or whatever, from Bishop-in-Charge, Mark Edington. It’s a longish read, but it’s worth it.

Unexpected Graves

Poor Mark and his wife Judy, who live in Paris, have been caught out by the closure of flights, and are in Massachussets (sp?) I think they have family and friends there, but all the same, it must be hard for him to be separated from his flock at this time! He joined us for our Zoom service (which I think was very generous of him, considering it was about 4.30 am where he was!) He was going on to join in other online services from the Convocation.

We are truly blessed to have him as our Bishop in Charge.

by Jorge Cocco

A Zoom Church Service

Christ Church, Clermont Ferrand, are holding a Zoom Meeting Church Service at 9.30 GMT, 10.30 CET (European time) tomorrow.

If you’d like to join in, send me an email, to alison(dot)wale(at)hotmail(dot)co(dot)uk and I will send you the link, the instructions on how to log in, and an order of service.

It’s the first time we’ve done this, so who knows what will happen!!

I’m leading the service, and giving a short homily. If you can’t join us, I’ll post the text on the CCCF sermon site later.

ETA: The sermon is now posted at the site. If you joined us, then thank you. We had a couple of unrecognised phone numbers joining in. If that was you, I hope you felt welcome and blessed.

I plan to blog later about my 40 Acts so far (or rather, my lack-of-40-Acts….), but I wanted to put this up, in case others wanted to join in with Church.

 

Keep safe, and keep washing your hands!!

(This little fella is how I’m finishing all my emails!!)

 

Various bits of art…

The verse from Proverbs that kicked off 40 Acts:

On Sunday I enjoyed playing with tissue paper and glue, creating this piece. I was planning to calligraph the words, but felt that this was a more harmonious way of adding them to the piece. I’m quite pleased with it.

This is a card I made for someone in Mr FD’s office. It was her birthday and Mr FD wanted to arrange something special for her. The “C” is because her name starts with a C, not for any random reason to do with crocodiles. I was a bit annoyed to find that my expensive white calligraphy felt pen had been left open, and so had dried up. The “Joyeux Anniversaire” is on a little blackboard, but unfortunately the writing was horrid, due to the aforementioned dried up state of the pen. So I had to do something different…

This is a piece I drew for friends from church who are going back to the States. Tom & Sheryl have been utter stalwarts and have really demonstrated Christianity in action. They will be surely missed. I wanted to give them something that was “of” Clermont Ferrand, and there is nothing more iconic of the area than Puy de Dome, the mountain that can be seen from almost anywhere in the city.

So that’s what I drew.

Do not fear: Sermon for Epiphany

Here is the sermon I preached yesterday – as I read it, and came to the end I thought (and said as much to the congregation) “That was shorter than it seemed when I wrote it!”

I was right! I’d forgotten that I’d printed it double sided, so I only read the first and the third pages, missing out everything between the two asterisks… I don’t think it mattered terribly, but I still feel a bit of a muppet!

Jeremiah:31:7-14 Psalm 84 Ephesians:1: 3-6,15-19a Matthew 2: 1-12

Today’s Gospel reading starts with fear and ends with joy. At the beginning the Magi, the Wise Men, the Seers from the East arrived at Herod’s palace and spoke of a baby, born to be King. And immediately Herod felt threatened. He feared that everything he knew would be taken from him, and that he would lose his power and his riches. And all Jerusalem was afraid – for they knew that if Herod was angered he’d no doubt take it out on them. And isn’t this so often the way today – the leaders of our countries want to hang onto their power, and their status, and because of this the ordinary people seem to be the ones who pay. Whatever your politics, I am sure that you can think of an example for yourself, for regardless of political beliefs this appears to be the way of the world.

From his very birth onwards Jesus challenges people. He turns worlds upside down. Perhaps now, we don’t quite realise how the incarnation, the idea that God has become human, was such an earth shattering notion for those living at the time. Although the Jewish people had an idea of a God who saves, a God who would, one day, come again as the Messiah, the thought of him breaking into humanity was unthinkable.

But the question that faced Herod is the one that faces us: how will you react to the child who has come to bridge the gap between the Divine and the human? Of course there will be fear: as Herod was afraid of losing all that he held dear, when facing the Almighty we too might fear losing control, losing security, of being asked to give things up. But we can choose to enfold ourselves in this fear, and close ourselves off from the wonders that Jesus offers us, or we can choose to stand, naked and shivering before God, afraid yet open to all that he will give us.

For if we recognise that Jesus is God’s outrageous gift of generosity that changes lives, then we can begin to move from the restrictive fear that Herod felt to the liberating joy that the Magi experienced as the star led them to the place where they could meet God. If we accept that Jesus is the bridge of hope and redemption we can move from despair to hope, from emptiness to fulfilment and from darkness to light. Jesus, Word made flesh, the physical presence of God, takes us from the reality of the incarnation to the unfolding realisation of who and what God is and does as we approach Epiphany. Without God’s inspiration and engagement, humanity would have remained stuck in a place far from hope and far from heaven.

God’s gift to the world was his taking flesh, being born, but we need to accept that gift. We must recognise our need, before we can understand the wonder. As Denise Levertov writes in her poem “On the Mystery of the Incarnation”: It’s when we face for a moment the worst our kind can do, and shudder to know the taint in our own selves, that awe cracks the mind’s shell and enters the heart.

(*) One of the phrases that Jesus said often during his ministry was: Do not fear. And it is that fear that he came to take from us.

Fear is the source of so much that is evil in this world: because people fear what will happen to their jobs they begin to abuse those who they think are to blame, because people fear what they don’t understand there is a rise in Islamophobia, in anti-Semitism, in homophobia… , because people fear they don’t have enough money, or possessions, there is a downturn in generosity, in caring for others. Fear breeds fear… When we forget that God is in control, it is then that we too feel fear, and that fear begins to cause us to become what we do not want to be, we recognise “the taint in our own selves” and we build walls between us and God, between us and others.

But Jesus tells us time and time again: do not fear. Even his name, given to Mary at the Annunciation, is a reminder that we have no cause to fear: Jesus, meaning God Saves.

Sometimes as a preacher there is a mystery as to why those who put the Lectionary together chose certain readings to go with certain others; but today there is no real mystery. The reading from Jeremiah is one that speaks of the hope for a future when God brings his faithful people home from exile. They will need to fear no more, for God is with them, he is faithful and true, and will fulfil his covenant. Human helplessness and hopelessness will be transformed by the unshakeable presence of God. The Psalm too speaks of the joy of knowing that God is close, and the Epistle reminds us that we – you and I – are adopted members of God’s family and it celebrates the belief that in Jesus, God plans to embrace all people and the entire created order.

The good news is that God chooses humanity. God is on our side, and will travel with us throughout history. We have not been left on our own or to our own devices. We have not been left without meaning to our lives, or directions to travel. We have choices and hope, because God chooses to identify with us. God chooses to accompany us throughout the journey of faith and life.

This is what the Incarnation is about – Emmanuel, God with us. God with us through the turmoil of life. God with us in the joys and sorrows. God with us when we don’t feel close to him. God with us in the valleys and the mountaintops. God with us at the start of a new year, full of uncertainty and confusion. Do not fear.

And that is what is at the heart of Matthew’s story of Jesus’ birth: the promise that it is precisely this world that God came to, this people so mastered by fear that we often do the unthinkable to each other and ourselves that God loves, this gaping need that we have and bear that God remedies. Jesus is Emmanuel, God with us, the living, breathing, and vulnerable promise that God chose to come live and die for us, as we are, so that in Christ’s resurrection we, too might experience newness of life. (*)

Whatever our fears may be, Epiphany reminds us that we can live our lives in a new light. Epiphany reminds us that Jesus, the light of the world, has arrived in all his rule-breaking, table-turning glory, helping us to see all things, and even ourselves, in new ways.

It is the greatest news that ever was, is, or shall be. “Take heart,” Jesus says, “It is I; have no fear.” May you and I always seek to live in the light of his promise.

A Pause in Advent…

Angela over at Tracing Rainbows is hosting “A Pause in Advent” where bloggers blog each week about Advent, giving us a pause from the business and maelstrom of Christmas preparations to think about what is coming…

I haven’t joined in as I wasn’t sure how much I’d feel like blogging (see Black Dog post from earlier) but I thought I’d add a few links…

Yesterday’s sermon

If you should be interested, here’s a link to

  1. Christ Church, Clermont Ferrand’s website
  2. The website where we publish the “weekly message” (though not always weekly…)

During the summer, the Eglise Reformée, who own the building, have their Sunday morning services there, so we have to have our service at 17h30. Not terribly convenient for people like me, who travel from some distance to get here, but there’s nothing to be done.  Because many of our parishioners go home to visit family, or take the opportunity to tour Europe, during this time, we took the decision to only have services every other week. It’s not ideal, but it does mean that the service leader doesn’t spend hours preparing a service for two people.

Yesterday I was taking the service – the one Eucharistic service in July. My sermon is on the site “Oh Taste and See“, under the title “Being and Doing” If you go to read it, it would be nice if you left a comment, evenif it’s just saying “Hello”!

I can just imagine Martha saying “Those vegetables won’t peel themselves, you know!”